devilflail:

"I staggered through my career and came out the other end alive. I made some films that meant something to me. In my opinion, they weren’t all great, and they weren’t all successful, but they sure were ‘me’. And this is what I was going through or thinking or feeling as a director at the time, and I’m very proud of them. A lot of great directors just never had the chance to have their work appreciated and celebrated and watched all these years after they were made. So, man, what do you want out of life? It’s great!" — John Carpenter

The KING.

(Source: strangewood)

4,071 notes

For me now, I think my fascination is with not a film, but an actor: John Wayne. For the last year, he’s really occupied my thoughts. I love John Wayne; I think he’s great. I love the movies he made with Howard Hawks, and I think as an actor, he embodied a whole kind of cinema. I hadn’t really appreciated him until this year, and now I can’t get enough. I feel like I keep imitating him in odd ways, and it just makes me look crazy. But I think the movies John Wayne was in—there’s this idea that he wasn’t doing anything, or he was doing the same thing the whole time. But I find him almost psychically different from movie to movie. He can be really scary in movies like Red River, or he can be very gentle. I like how much time he takes for everything; he really takes his goddamn time to walk, or to talk. Maybe because I struggle with it as an actor—taking your time, you don’t have to rush anything—watching him, it’s such a generous amount of time he takes with everything, and the way he looks at people, it’s almost like he’s moving at a slower frame rate. That’s what I always aspire to. I look at him and think, ‘How?’ Film is so precious. I know he’s making big Hollywood movies, but it’s still actual film. It’s not digital; they have to print this stuff. And he’s like, ‘I’m gonna take five seconds to walk to the door, ’cause that’s what I’m doing right now.’ Everything is just so unhurried, and there’s something great about that.
Greta Gerwig (via kmmbig)

23 notes

"This city is like an open sewer, it’s full of filth and scum. Sometimes I can hardly take it." - Taxi Driver (1976)

3,305 notes

occupiedterritories:

The Fog (John Carpenter, 1980)

The many forms that evil can take, the many places in which it can appear, the infinite ways in which it can announce itself, the ease with which it can blend into the rhythms and atmospheres of everyday life – this is Carpenter’s focus, and the moral clarity that he brings to that focus is what makes him a great director. Adrienne Barbeau’s slow walk down the stairs to her lighthouse radio station, with its odd sensation of reality peeling away its skin, in The Fog; a reanimated zombie standing before a mirror, in Prince of Darkness, and shivering with a nameless, inarticulate longing for what lies on the other side; the world suddenly turning blue at the will and ease of a demonic novelist, in In the Mouth of Madness – these are moments unlike any others in American cinema, where the balance between legibility and fluidity, between the real and the ir-real, is perfectly achieved and held.  —Kent Jones, “American Movie Classic: John Carpenter" Film Comment (Jan/Feb 1999)

occupiedterritories:

The Fog (John Carpenter, 1980)

The many forms that evil can take, the many places in which it can appear, the infinite ways in which it can announce itself, the ease with which it can blend into the rhythms and atmospheres of everyday life – this is Carpenter’s focus, and the moral clarity that he brings to that focus is what makes him a great director. Adrienne Barbeau’s slow walk down the stairs to her lighthouse radio station, with its odd sensation of reality peeling away its skin, in The Fog; a reanimated zombie standing before a mirror, in Prince of Darkness, and shivering with a nameless, inarticulate longing for what lies on the other side; the world suddenly turning blue at the will and ease of a demonic novelist, in In the Mouth of Madness – these are moments unlike any others in American cinema, where the balance between legibility and fluidity, between the real and the ir-real, is perfectly achieved and held.

—Kent Jones, “American Movie Classic: John Carpenter" Film Comment (Jan/Feb 1999)

73 notes

Cat subjectivity from Inside Llewyn Davis, my favorite movie of 2013.

(Source: caithsithfa)

1,872 notes

"Simplicity! Greater and greater simplicity—that will be the keynote of the new films. Our whole effort must be bent toward ridding motion pictures of all that does not belong to them, of all that is unnecessary and trivial and drawn from other sources—all the tricks, gags, ‘business’ not of the cinema, but of the stage and the written book. That is what has been accomplished when certain films reached the level of great art. That is what I tried to do in The Last Laugh. We must try for more and more simplicity and devotion to pure motion picture technique and material.”

F.W. Murnau
December 28, 1888 — March 11, 1931

(Source: strangewood)

715 notes

thetygre:

blackoutraven:

20three » The 1967 Russian horror film ‘Viy’ 


Not just Russian; Soviet! Viy was the first major horror film to be made in the Soviet Union.

1,355 notes

To me, the devil is cheerful, agile. He looks like a little girl.

(Source: suchasadaffair)

256 notes